MCKINNEY-VENTO (STEP)

  • The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 reauthorized the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. The program is now referred to as the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Improvement Act of 2001. This part of the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) is intended to ensure that students in transition are not left behind in school. Stability and adequacy of the living arrangement are critical considerations when determining qualifications. The term “student in transition” means individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence.

    Students who qualify for the Mc-Kinney Vento Homeless Assistance Act are identified by the Student Residency Forms which are completed by all families in Skyward at the beginning of each school year. If your student(s) qualify for these services, you will be contacted via letter sent home.

    Grade level school counselors are the McKinney-Vento liasons for their students. If you have any questions regarding McKinney-Vento, please feel free to contact the school at 615-758-5152 and ask to speak to your child's school counselor.

Section 504

  • School counselors service as the Section 504 coordinators for the students within their assigned grade. Section 504 is a civil rights statute which provides: “No otherwise qualified individual with handicaps in the United States…shall, solely by reason of his/her handicap, be excluded from the participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance.” 29 USC § 794

    The Rehabilitation Act of 1973, commonly referred to as Section 504, is a federal nondiscrimination statute. The purpose of the Act is to prohibit discrimination and to assure that disabled students have educational opportunities and benefits equal to those provided to nondisabled students.

    An eligible student under Section 504 is a student who:

    a) Has a disability

    b) Has a record of having a disability

    c) Is regarded as having a physical or mental impairment which substantially limits a major life activity such as learning, self-care, walking, seeing, hearing, speaking, breathing, working and performing manual tasks.

    If you would like more information about Section 504, please contact your child's school counselor, or the Wilson County School's District 504 Coordinator, Tammy Crane 615.444.3282 (cranetr@wcschools.com).

Bullying Prevention

  • The Olweus Program (pronounced Ol-VAY-us) is a comprehensive approach that includes schoolwide, classroom, individual, and community components. The program is focused on long-term change that creates a safe and positive school climate. It is designed and evaluated for use in elementary, middle, junior high and high schools (K-12). The program’s goals are to reduce and prevent bullying problems among schoolchildren and to improve peer relations at school. The program has been found to reduce bullying among children, improve the social climate of classrooms, and reduce related antisocial behaviors, such as vandalism and truancy. The Olweus Program has been implemented in more than a dozen countries around the world, and in thousands of schools in the United States. Wilson County Schools began implementation the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program during the 2013-2014 school year. We here at Elzie Patton are excited to continue our implementation efforts this year!

    Program Goals

    The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program is designed to improve peer relations and make schools safer, more positive places for students to learn and develop. Goals of the program include:

    • reducing existing bullying problems among students
    • preventing the development of new bullying problems
    • achieving better peer relations at school

    Outcomes of the Program

    Statistics show how successful implementation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program can reduce school bullying. Outcomes have included:

    • Fifty percent or more reductions in student reports of being bullied and bullying others. Peer and teacher ratings of bullying problems have yielded similar results.
    • Significant reductions in student reports of general antisocial behavior such as school bullying, vandalism, school violence, fighting, theft, and truancy.
    • Significant improvements in the classroom social climate as reflected in students' reports of improved order and discipline, more positive social relationships, and more positive attitudes toward schoolwork and school.
    • Greater support for students who are bullied, and stronger, more effective interventions for students who bully
    • For more information, visit: Violence Prevention Works! Home of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program